My overall learning process (reflection)

4 Nov

 cat

(Jasmine 2013)

The process of creating my personal digital piece was a unique learning experience which I will cherish; with regards to the challenges encountered with not only my movie making skills but with my perception of social media. I chose to share, my respective journey of the convergence of media platforms and space by means of a traditional movie-documentary format which is relatable to the today’s audience. Ironically, by making my digital movie, I extended my media voice and was able to connect my private experiences with a global audience. The overall process was plagued with ethical issues regarding content, vigorous editing and re-editing; all needed to create a piece that would be believable, relatable and provoke the audience to ponder their own social media usage and make the change.

My digital story, ‘#disconnected’ divulges my individual plight of turning my back on technology; my decision to discontinue my social media usage and put away my mobile phone for 14 entire days. The reasoning behind my own quest was the video, The Amish Project which we watched in class where Jake P. Reilly’s disconnected from technology for 90 days. My experiment may only be 14 days but the evaluations are similar, I too experienced personal highs and lows just maybe not as extreme. I chose to expand on this idea by addressing my own obsession with being connected online, the sacrifices I had made to my immediate personal relationships and the fact that I struggled with my own company.

There are numerous digital detox stories already online. With social media being so prevalent in today’s society, it was important to me to view and understand each journey in order to gather the true essence of ‘disconnection’ when presenting my own movie. Despite that a majority of these journeys disclosed similar revelations of self-discovery, the perceptions were individual and to me, significant and relatable.

Creating something that is uniquely you, is remarkable; beginning with the task chosen, the photos developed, the words and the emotions expressed. I choose the digital platform, MovieMaker because of its simplicity, format and its clarity regarding its visual and audio effects of stilled images, videos, voiceovers and written slideshows. I wanted to present my observations, to get my message across and this process not only broadened my technological skills, it also showcased my story-telling talents. I learnt about myself and the way I challenge change. In its entirety, it took me five attempts before I was truly happy with my approach and visual portrayal of My Digital Detox; through experience and through extensive research, I expanded on my methodology and produced a true representation of me and my relationship with social media.

 phone

(Rubin 2013)

The above image ( Rubin 2013)  pinpoints social media’s hold on society and inspired my direction and overall focus of my digital story. Social media can dictate one’s perception of friends where one can concentrate on ‘quantity’ 1000+ Facebook friends rather than the ‘quality’ of the friendship or of life. We are consumed with the consumption of digital media that we cannot envision real relationships which are happening in front of our eyes.

My BCM240 course has discussed ethical factors which come into play when using media content (photos, music) to create a digital piece. My studies have defined my own understanding of ethical considerations involving other individual’ content and through creative commons, I was able to research the fair use of images and music. I chose to safeguard my content against copyright by enhancing my personal documentary with a majority of my own photos; emphasizing the personal touch.  Any additional images and the music included were produced by other parties so were scrutinized regarding copyright issues/creative commons and cleared as acceptable to use.  All photos and music were suitable citied in the reference list at the end of movie as well as in this blogpost.

It was through tutorial discussions and the valuable advice given by staff, I was able to expand on my original and very naïve attempt at a digital movie depicting the relationship between audiences, space and media. I have assessed and documented my personal journey through my reflections, images, supplementary research and interviews with friends and family, all of which have enriched my experience. My new-found movie-making skills and confidence has encouraged me to pursue the perfect media platform and the ideal space for my message to be presented to the largest audience. This assessment presented me with alternatives; methods and concepts to enable my mindset to think outside the box.

It has been an intimate experience and though I feel vulnerable placing my journey online,  I want to share . The digital detox changed my life and through my eyes I hope it can change or at least alter the mindset of others. I may have reconnected my social media accounts  but my perceptions and usage have changed. I have deleted more than 40% of my Facebook friends as I have assessed that the quality of life and the familiarity of relationships does surpass  mere numbers (quantity). I have learnt many valuable lessons regarding myself, media and our society, that I will embrace and apply in my future studies of Media and Communications and in my overall outlook of life.

Reference List (for both video and reflection)

A Digital Detox From Wired Technology, 2013, audio, American Public Media, produced P Judge, 26 July, accessed 23 September 2013, <http://www.thestory.org/stories/2013-07/digital-detox-wired-technology>

Applin, S & Fischer, M 2011, A Cultural Perspective on Mixed, Dual and Blended Reality, Academic.edu, accessed 8 October, <http://www.academia.edu/612744/A_Cultural_Perspective_on_Mixed_Dual_and_Blended_Reality>

Art Revolution 2013, Life is what happens to you while you’re looking at your Smartphone, image, accessed 26 October 2013, < http://www.anonymousartofrevolution.com/2013/02/life-is-what-happens-to-you-while-youre.html>

Cook, B 2013, Claire in Chair on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire eating a Burger on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire on phone at lunch with Girlfriends, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire in Chair on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cook, B 2013, Claire in car park, image, NSW, Australia, taken 1 October

Cook, H 2013, Claire at Gym on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, H 2013, Claire drinking coffee on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, H 2013, Claire sitting on road, car park, image, NSW, Australia, taken 2 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Online Symbols, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Number of Facebook friends, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Girls in room all on phone, video, NSW, Australia, taken 13 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing of social media platforms crossed out, image, NSW, Australia, taken 19 October

Cresswell, C 2013, List of Duties- No social media, image, NSW, Australia, Taken 19 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Facebook status- to quit social media, image, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Facebook acknowledgement, account deactivated, image, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Photos on wall, made to look like mobile phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Darrin stepdad about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Harry, flat-mate about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Sam, flat-mate about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Claire, friend about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Katie, friend about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Peter Fitzpatrick, Mother’s boss about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, 2nd day of Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 25 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Girls having lunch on phones, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing no social media for one week, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing self-portrait- sad face, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, My dorm door- notes, image, NSW, Australia, taken 4 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Note under door, image, NSW, Australia, taken 4 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Beach Pool, image, NSW, Australia, taken 5 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Books and tea on desk, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

Cook, H 2013, Claire laughing, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Lunch on the beach, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

deGuzman, C & Crawford, M 2013, I Forgot My Phone, online video, 22 August, YouTube, accessed 2nd October 2013, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OINa46HeWg8>

Fischer, M D 2008, ‘Cultural dynamics: formal descriptions of cultural processes’, Structure and Dynamics, volume 3, issue 2, accessed 10 October 2013, <http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/557126nz#page-6>

Flickr  2013, Creative Commons, accessed 14 October 2013, < http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/>

Henderson, M 2012, 3 Reasons You Should Quit Social Media in 2013, Forbes, 29 December, accessed 9 October 2013, <http://www.forbes.com/sites/jmaureenhenderson/2012/12/29/3-reasons-you-should-quit-social-media-in-2013/>

Jasmine 2013, cat, image, curlicue, accessed 16th October 2013, <http://www.curlicueblog.com/2013/03/im-joining-circus.html>

Lane, C 2013, Claire crying eating ice-cream, image, NSW, Australia, taken 2 October

Lane, C 2013, Relay for Life, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Niemer, E 2012, “Teenagers and Social Media”: How to connect with – and protect – your kids online’, alive Australia: Health, 16 August, accessed 12 October 2013, <http://www.alive.com/articles/view/23615/teenagers_and_social_media>

Parsons, B 2013, Claire on the bus on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Parsons, B 2013, Claire in room watching TV on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Rubin, D 2013, ?Digital Detox: Could You Go Two Weeks Without Technology??, NEWS to live by, 8 January, accessed 24 September 2013, < http://www.newstoliveby.net/2013/01/08/digital-detox-two-weeks-without-technology/>

Spiegel, E & Murphy, B 2013, The Liquid Self, weblog, accessed 19 October 2013,  <http://blog.snapchat.com/post/61770468323/the-liquid-self >

 TEDtalksDirector 2012, Connected, but alone?, online video, 3 April, YouTube, viewed 1st October 2013, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Xr3AsBEK4>

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Video

#disconnected

4 Nov

This is my digital story of the process of giving up technology and social media for 14 days!
Try the digital detox for yourself!!

 

 

Reference List (for both video and reflection)

A Digital Detox From Wired Technology, 2013, audio, American Public Media, produced P Judge, 26 July, accessed 23 September 2013, <http://www.thestory.org/stories/2013-07/digital-detox-wired-technology>

Applin, S & Fischer, M 2011, A Cultural Perspective on Mixed, Dual and Blended Reality, Academic.edu, accessed 8 October, <http://www.academia.edu/612744/A_Cultural_Perspective_on_Mixed_Dual_and_Blended_Reality>

Art Revolution 2013, Life is what happens to you while you’re looking at your Smartphone, image, accessed 26 October 2013, <http://www.anonymousartofrevolution.com/2013/02/life-is-what-happens-to-you-while-youre.html>

Cook, B 2013, Claire in Chair on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire eating a Burger on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire on phone at lunch with Girlfriends, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, B 2013, Claire in Chair on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cook, B 2013, Claire in car park, image, NSW, Australia, taken 1 October

Cook, H 2013, Claire at Gym on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, H 2013, Claire drinking coffee on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cook, H 2013, Claire sitting on road, car park, image, NSW, Australia, taken 2 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Online Symbols, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Number of Facebook friends, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Girls in room all on phone, video, NSW, Australia, taken 13 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing of social media platforms crossed out, image, NSW, Australia, taken 19 October

Cresswell, C 2013, List of Duties- No social media, image, NSW, Australia, Taken 19 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Facebook status- to quit social media, image, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Facebook acknowledgement, account deactivated, image, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Photos on wall, made to look like mobile phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 14 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Darrin stepdad about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Harry, flat-mate about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Sam, flat-mate about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Claire, friend about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Katie, friend about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 24 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Peter Fitzpatrick, Mother’s boss about my Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 23 September

Cresswell, C 2013, 2nd day of Detox, video, NSW, Australia, taken 25 September

Cresswell, C 2013, Girls having lunch on phones, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing no social media for one week, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Drawing self-portrait- sad face, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Cresswell, C 2013, My dorm door- notes, image, NSW, Australia, taken 4 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Note under door, image, NSW, Australia, taken 4 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Beach Pool, image, NSW, Australia, taken 5 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Books and tea on desk, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

Cook, H 2013, Claire laughing, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

Cresswell, C 2013, Lunch on the beach, image, NSW, Australia, taken 6 October

deGuzman, C & Crawford, M 2013, I Forgot My Phone, online video, 22 August, YouTube, accessed 2nd October 2013, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OINa46HeWg8>

Fischer, M D 2008, ‘Cultural dynamics: formal descriptions of cultural processes’, Structure and Dynamics, volume 3, issue 2, accessed 10 October 2013, <http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/557126nz#page-6>

Flickr  2013, Creative Commons, accessed 14 October 2013, <http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/>

Henderson, M 2012, 3 Reasons You Should Quit Social Media in 2013, Forbes, 29 December, accessed 9 October 2013, <http://www.forbes.com/sites/jmaureenhenderson/2012/12/29/3-reasons-you-should-quit-social-media-in-2013/>

Jasmine 2013, cat, image, curlicue, accessed 16th October 2013, <http://www.curlicueblog.com/2013/03/im-joining-circus.html>

Lane, C 2013, Claire crying eating ice-cream, image, NSW, Australia, taken 2 October

Lane, C 2013, Relay for Life, image, NSW, Australia, taken 3 October

Niemer, E 2012, “Teenagers and Social Media”: How to connect with – and protect – your kids online’, alive Australia: Health, 16 August, accessed 12 October 2013, <http://www.alive.com/articles/view/23615/teenagers_and_social_media>

Parsons, B 2013, Claire on the bus on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Parsons, B 2013, Claire in room watching TV on phone, image, NSW, Australia, taken 22 September

Rubin, D 2013, ?Digital Detox: Could You Go Two Weeks Without Technology??, NEWS to live by, 8 January, accessed 24 September 2013, <http://www.newstoliveby.net/2013/01/08/digital-detox-two-weeks-without-technology/>

Spiegel, E & Murphy, B 2013, The Liquid Self, weblog, accessed 19 October 2013, <http://blog.snapchat.com/post/61770468323/the-liquid-self >

 TEDtalksDirector 2012, Connected, but alone?, online video, 3 April, YouTube, viewed 1st October 2013, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Xr3AsBEK4>

All good things must come to an end

27 Sep

It is with great regret that I say farewell to my weekly BCM240 routine of blogging on the topic of media, audience and places; space which may be privately public or publically private. Fear not, loyal followers as I am now an addicted blogger, and have learnt to embrace sharing my personal opinions on the worldwide web and will continue to blog on, in one online form or another.

I relish in my new-found online persona and value my blogging journey.  As my confidence level grew, I embarked on sharing my blogs through other social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, expanding my readership. By extending my online voice over social media, my follower base increased. Initially, this was not an easy task as I was hesitant to introduce my Facebook friends to scrutinize my academic handiwork but after receiving their positive support, sharing my blogs with friends and family was well-received and ultimately become a successful self-promoting tool.

reflection11reflection 22

To facilitate my research and enlighten my understanding of the given themes, I chose to follow my fellow BCM240 student bloggers material, using WordPress and Twitter as a means of gathering information and handy references.  These online platforms helped expand my own ideas and opinions regarding media platforms, the audience that use them and the space/places we indulge in our media consumption. My newly discovered understanding and self-confidence encouraged my own discussions but also prompted me to want to share my feedback. I began to comment on fellow bloggers posts, sharing my opinions and reflections regarding their work and viewpoints. This action benefited both parties; as I received a chance to share and comment while the blogger received a critique of his/her work. As a result of sharing my opinions, online researching and posting my feedback, my blog audience grew from being restrictively Australian based to gaining global recognition.

reflection

Statistically, my current tally of global readers who visit my BCM240 collection of blogs is nudging 300; not bad for an inexperienced rambler. This positive result confirms that blogging is prevalent and socially accepted justifying why the interest in civil journalism is on the increase. This tally illustrates that anyone; no matter what their background or status, can share their ideas online and have their voice heard!

The media, audience and places course outline presented me personally with a plethora of new ideas and new researching tools by incorporated relative links to develop on my thoughts. BCM240 subjects’ research topics tend to be unique and not well publicized, encouraging me to look outside the obvious Google links. By strategically, searching new website browsers, I was able to acquire relevant data and sources that enhanced my online voice. This term, I have blogged on range of specific topics. I have expanded my knowledge of public screens and all the connotations; negative and positive that come with it, the piracy laws that restrict Australian audiences from being up to date with their favorite TV shows and the power that online media gives the fandom community to stay connected and share their fanatical love.

Overall, my blogging journey and success has been a shared one. I have utilised strategies to increase my audience traffic, I have built relationships with my fellow media students and learnt how one topic can be extended into multiple unique blog posts. The process of blogging for BCM240 has been rewarding and a learning experience as I have found blog posting so different to other forms of academic or creative writing. I believe I have improved my tone and clarity, achieving a professional and formal of writing that is appropriate for a public audience while keeping my wit and sense of fun. By incorporating individual stories and photos of my life, I have established a relationship with my audience on a personal level.  I have specifically practiced and taken the time to the structure my blogs so they are both organised and easy to read.

I hope you have enjoyed reading my media, audience and place blogs just as much as I have enjoyed writing them. As you may already know, it is unlike me to go out without a bang, so here we go 🙂

REFERENCES

BonisBoyz 2009, ‘fireworks gone wrong’ youtube video, accessed 26th September 2013, <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nckkYeseKSY&feature=fvwrel- >

The era of the mobile phone…

27 Sep

In today’s society, to not have a mobile phone is not only social suicide but prehistoric-you are a technophobe. Media convergence and technology advancements have adapted the mobile phone into a necessary social media hub. It is not just a phone; it is a camera,  a navigator,  a computer and it has  morphed into a compact audience-friendly must. The mobile user is presented with a plethora of media options and applications but how does the individual balance the private use of his/her phone in a public space?

To clarify this space dilemma, one must look at the individual and his/her mobile phone routine. Some individuals use their phone to peruse the lives of others while keeping  their own stories unwraps while others share their entire existence online; from what they ate for breakfast to what they are wearing. Unfortunately, for myself as a university student, my entire life is contained in some format on my mobile phone. My phone is my uni note taker, my personal assistant, my photographer and my therapist when I need a time out. This digital dependancy is the reason why if we lose or break our phone, we become comatose and find it hard to function. So wherever we go, our phone must come too.

My mobile phone  dependency is shared with many Wollongongians. On the free bus to University, all my fellow passengers are mesmerized by their mobile phone, from the primary kids to the grandparents. In a bus setting, we are in a public space but our conversations are contained, are private. Initiating face to face communication with fellow commuters on the bus is random; however we are confident to Facebook or text who is a friend of a friend. Mobile phones provide a built-in confidence builder; a device that protects its user from social humiliation and being rejected face to face.

unplugged-peopel-texting-on-bus-520x438

The use of the mobile phone enables the user to break down barriers, whether they are social, geographic or emotional. They allow its user to record and share live action footage , they can even save your life via internal tracking. Fun fact, a mobile phone in Japanese is called a ‘keitai’ meaning always with you;  I love my keitai.

This unconditional love is currently being  challenged as I am embarking on a untravelled  road of discovery and have deleted my Facebook account, Snapchat and Instagram. I confess I have  became  too attached to these mediums and need to detox from my social media addiction. The first few days have been quite difficult, feeling somewhat naked without my phone. I missed events that had been created and as I was not able to contact people and visa versa; it was as if I was out of the social loop and alone. Eventually, I began to appreciate the  process as I discovered I had all  this time on my hands as I was not relying on my Facebook notification ! This experiment  did show me who and what was important in my life. Who would take the extra step in trying to contact me in via alternate methods such as ‘writing on walls’, ‘poking’ and ‘tagging’. I have been able to engage in the conversations around me instead of segregating myself and dis-including myself like I had done in the past while typing away on my phone.

Halliday, J 2011, ‘London riots: how BlackBerry Messenger played a key role. Police looking on Facebook and Twitter for signs of unrest spreading will have missed out – they should have watched BBM’, theguardian, 8 August, accessed 25th September 2013, < http://www.theguardian.com/media/2011/aug/08/london-riots-facebook-twitter-blackberry>

Gray,D 2013, ‘How to Use Your Mobile Phone in a Public Space’, youtube video, accessed 25th September 2013, <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymiKY7EXTBU>

Staff Writer 2013, ‘This brutal take-down shows why it’s a good idea to dump someone by text message’, new.com.au, 26 September, accessed 26th September 2013, <http://www.news.com.au/technology/this-brutal-takedown-shows-why-it8217s-a-good-idea-to-dump-someone-by-text-message/story-e6frfro0-1226727566198>

Does a bigger screen give audiences a clearer picture?

23 Sep

Proliferations of screens have materialized throughout the public arena providing society with information, with instructions and unfortunately visual pollution. These public media platforms are ubiquitous, attempting to grab the attentiveness of audiences; from the student wandering between lectures at university, the patient waiting quietly at the doctors to the family eating lunch at their local food court. These unrestricted intrusions on society, these subliminal messages have become a cultural norm. But is this constant invasion of marketing, informative or unethical?

Some marketing agencies get it right and place their public screens in the ideal location achieving maximum positive exposure. At my university (University of Wollongong) screens are placed  in high traffic areas such as cafes, in the region of the student car parks and in areas where students spend a lot of time like building 19 (so confusing, I have been here 2 years and still get lost). Likewise, my campus (Campus East) has a large screen in the foyer situated by the office; students MUST walk past it in order to get to the cafeteria. The media content relayed from this screen is primarily resident information; important dates, contact details or photos of past events. You would think, located in prime position and conveying relevant data this screen would be popular but my observational qualitative research exposed this screen as being often overlooked. The audience involved (the residents) pass through this space in a hurry to get food, a coffee or a bus so the screen and its content doesn’t take priority. So how effective are these public screens and their content? I personally don’t take notice of either of these screens, unless there are pictures that appeal to me such as delicious food, ice cream or coffee.


 Untitled2Untitled1

(Photos located at University of Wollongong & Campus East -copyright Claire Cresswell)

What about on a larger scale; is digital outdoor marketing ethical? In 2007, the Mayor of Sao Paulo, Brazil, Gilberto Kassab endorsed a ban on digital advertising in a public space because of greenhouse gases. “Until we end consumerism and the rampant advertising that drives it, we will not solve the climate crisis” (Worldwatch 2013). This ‘Clean City Law’ rid the city of the digital façade enabling the true identity and urban architecture of Sao Paulo to be reinstated.

Public screens can offer social interaction if the content and the location is audience-friendly. “In a free society we should be able to decide when and where we are subjected to advertising” (Gannon & Lawson 2010, pg 5). Seeburger’s research showed that people were more inclined to watch the public screens while waiting for their friends in a meeting place,  there “they would probably interact with the screens while waiting for someone in the space” (2012, pg 533).

At Campus East, we have screens in the cafeteria area which are ideal for watching a movie as a group/campus or can be run as a social event. This is a great example of turning a private space (usually watch a movie in your own campus room) into a public space (where you can socialise with friends). Public screening of sports at the local pubs is also popular amongst audiences. Big games such as State of Origins and Grand Finals always attract a huge crowd; drawn together by the social camaraderie, the media content and the ideal location.

Untitled

Photo of an individual at the local FoodCourt (copyright-Claire Cresswell)

These public screens may be bigger but do these media platforms get the audiences’ attention? Do you notice them? or are you another victim of advertising overload? Comment away please!

REFERENCES

BanBillboardBlight 2013, Sao Paulo: Before and After, online video, accessed 21st September 2013, <http://banbillboardblight.org/video/sao-paulo-before-and-after/>

Gannon,Z & Lawson,N 2010, ‘The Advertising Effect- How do we get the balance of advertising right’, Compass, Southbank House, London, accessed 21st September 2013, <http://clients.squareeye.net/uploads/compass/documents/The%20advertising%20effect%20-%20compass.pdf>

Seeburger, J & Foth, M 2012, ‘Content Sharing on Public Screens: Experiences through Iterating Social and Spatial Contexts’, accessed 25th September 2013, <http://delivery.acm.org.ezproxy.uow.edu.au/10.1145/2420000/2414618/p530-seeburger.pdf?ip=130.130.37.85&id=2414618&acc=ACTIVE%20SERVICE&key=C2716FEBFA981EF15E4BFB9DBBCB5F1B109B1AC210BBC559&CFID=365575980&CFTOKEN=67565164&__acm__=1380250855_ec5e5f8d2fc09195a4f87c4f62267104>

WorldWatch Institute 2013, ‘São Paulo Bans Outdoor Ads in Fight Against Pollution, accessed 21st September 2013, <http://www.worldwatch.org/node/5338>

Arrrrrrrr we all guilty of media piracy?

17 Sep

Piracy is plentiful in the context of media content in today’s society due to the convergence of media platforms fighting to acquire the ideal remix. Audiences are presented with a range of regulatory options when downloading media but what happens when the legitimate services are not the easiest, are not the quickest, are not the best quality; do we have permission to jump ship and become pirates?

13706248-cartoon-pirate-with-a-hook-and-cutlass-isolated-on-white

The future of media and audience engagement is governed by regulations, which are personally rigid and outdated. These laws may deter the piracy empire but also inhibits an audiences’ ability to produce and enjoy a better product. With regards to television/internet products “illegal downloading is the most usable and feature-rich, and bears the greatest potential for pioneering new modes of audience engagement” (Kosnik, 2010, p2). In this circumstance, piracy could be classed as a threat to the legitimate regulator but also as an incentive for those media corporations to shape their product to suit audience’s media demands.

(Photo image-Brand, 2010)

Australian audiences’ television viewing is driven by trends; many of which are influenced by the global media hype of our American neighbours but dictated by Australian Piracy Laws. We are exposed to an onslaught of tantalizing advertisements and reviews for universally acclaimed American TV broadcasts such as the ‘Game of Thrones’ series and then penalised to wait an additional week because of the internal politics of the entertainment industry. Alternatively, the Australian consumer can acquire their own copy of ‘Game of Thrones’ through visiting pirate sites known as the ‘torrent directory’ and having the convenience of peer to peer file sharing through BitTorrent file simultaneously. Statistics gathered by TorrentFreak (Ernesto 2012) label ‘Games of Thrones’, as the most pirated TV show with over 3 million global downloads per episode; of which Australia was declared the leading pirate country with 10.1%.

images

(Herzog, 2013)

Illegal downloading may be morally wrong but why is it so consumer-friendly? One can single search online for any television program from any network, only need to visit one website, use the same software each time, learn only one interface, acquire a portable, global product and have the freedom of cutting our American neighbours time restrictions. Its kind of like having a cake on display in arms reach but telling a kid not to eat it! Instead of being treated as a menace to society, perhaps media piracy could be used as a guide to ascertain what audiences are after when acquiring media content, with Legal Services modelling their protocols directly on a standard which seems to work. I realise that there are legitimate rules and regulations necessary between media producers and distributors and I definitely do not foresee a quick fix solution. Personally, I would be flattered if anyone took the time to download, to stream, to push record any of my work, you have my blessing for when I am famous! 😉

Are we really infringing or are we just impatience for something better or on time with the rest of the world? Are we classed as true fans of television shows and music, if we illegally download them rather than physically buying  the media source?

Comment or Tweet your ideas!!

 

REFERENCES

De Kosnik, A 2010, ‘Piracy is the Future of Television’, Convergence Culture Consortium, University of California, Berkeley, accesses 14th September 2013, < http://boletines.prisadigital.com/piracy_future_television-full.pdf>

Ernesto 2012, ‘Who’s Pirating Game of Thrones, and Why?,’ TorrentFreak, blog, accessed 15th September,  <http://torrentfreak.com/whos-pirating-game-of-thrones-and-why-120520/> 

Herzog, L 2013, ‘Is The Book Better? Game of Thrones Edition’, theLFB, accessed 25th September 2013, <http://the-lfb.com/2013/05/16/is-the-book-better-game-of-thrones-edition/>

The Australian Collaboration 2013, ‘Democracy in Australia – Media concentration and media laws’, accessed 25thSeptember 2013,< http://www.australiancollaboration.com.au/pdf/Democracy/Media-laws.pdf >

2013, Illustration – Cartoon pirate with a hook and cutlass Isolated on white, accessed 15th September 2013, <http://www.123rf.com/photo_13706248_cartoon-pirate-with-a-hook-and-cutlass-isolated-on-white.html>

Fandom is the new black.

9 Sep

Fandom is a current trend that is prevalent and socially accepted in today’s community, mutating from its primarily geeky foundations into an innovative phase of popular culture. We are all guilty of being fanatical about something or someone and with the advancements in media convergence, connecting with your self-selected audience is not only simple but also empowering.  Ultimately fan members “share a common set of texts, values, experiences and vernacular culture” (Wiatrowski 2011, pg 6); being a fan is now a way of life. fandom

Before the Internet, communication between fans was limited and problematic. My obsession growing up as a child was not Harry Potter or Hannah Montana but Dwayne Johnson aka The Rock; I loved my WWE Wrestling. I may have not had a traditional 10 year old girl crush, but I could have taught the Beiber fever and One Direction girl fans of today how to scream. I was vocal and passionate about the ‘sport’ but found my fan collaboration opportunities limited due to the audience demographic being American-based as the broadcasted bouts were specifically designed with this in mind. The opportunities for the Australian fan participating in the WWE culture included the following; a possible annual event held in a major Australian city (geographical restrictions) magazines (time delays due to postage) and pay TV televised relays (financial burden and differing time zones). These physical and personal obstacles made my quest to be a WWE fan a challenging and lonesome experience.

wrestling-blog                 blog-wrestling

               The Rock: Dwayne Johnson               My Little Self in Melbourne 2002

“Fandom, in the information age, has become a well-connected global village capable of coordinated and immediate worldwide contact” (Wiatrowski 2011, pg 1-2). This participatory culture has evolved via the benefits of global online media by utilising the public sphere to connect audiences and collaborate on a mass scale creating cyber-communities. With the advancement of technology, time and space restraints have been minimised and previous barriers including location, language differences and financial difficulty radically diminished. All these factors have given the fan’s voice while reinstating his or her power in media’s virtual space.

Screen Shot 2013-09-27 at 11.23.29 AMFamous words of Henry Jenkins

Society and the media, has been bombarded with the fandom craze, with fans vocalizing their opinions via Facebook pages, tweeting, posting blogs and web chats. Fans have the opportunity to globally interact and connect with their chosen celebrity as well as share their views with fan community. These interactions involve active consumers and rely heavily on a common emotion and/or interest. Each fan has the ability to become a producer in their participatory community and utilise their individual power through online voting, opinion polls and the freedom of speech.

I am an adamant pro-fandom supporter as this culture appeals to my sense of belonging. Regrettably, I have outgrown my WWE phase and have now mutated into a mature reality TV junkie/type-one-harmless celebrity stalker. My fandom at Campus East is fanatical, my online media connection passionate and my participatory culture eager to listen, share and embellish.

A fan is no longer a stereotypical geek with poor social skills. If you partake in Facebook pages, SMS television voting, online celebrity stalking, congratulations, as you too are trendy…you too are a member of fan culture!

dork-blog

(Nowakowski, 2012)

REFERENCES

Marikar, M 2010, ‘Justin Bieber’s Fans: Crazy or Just Babies?‘, abcnews, 5 January, accessed 26th September 2013, <http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/justin-biebers-fans-angry-selena-gomez/story?id=12539302>

Project Fandom 2012, Project Fandom Fee to Geek, image, viewed 15th September 2013,     < http://projectfandom.com/wp-content/themes/vcon-wp/img/pf_logo.png&gt;  (source of top image)

Rickman,G 1993, Reviwed work(s) Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture by Henry Jenkins, Film Quarterly, Vol. 46, No 4 (Summer, 1993), p.63, accessed 25th September 2013 ,<http://ey9ff7jb6l.search.serialssolutions.com/?ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_enc=info%3Aofi%2Fenc%3AUTF-8&rfr_id=info:sid/summon.serialssolutions.com&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&rft.genre=article&rft.atitle=Textual+Poachers%3A+Television+Fans+and+Participatory+Culture+.+Henry+Jenkins&rft.jtitle=Film+Quarterly&rft.au=Rickman%2C+Gregg&rft.date=1993-07-01&rft.issn=0015-1386&rft.eissn=1533-8630&rft.volume=46&rft.issue=4&rft.spage=63&rft.epage=63&rft_id=info:doi/10.1525%2Ffq.1993.46.4.04a00460&rft.externalDBID=n%2Fa&rft.externalDocID=10_1525_fq_1993_46_4_04a00460&paramdict=en-US>

White, A 2012, Boozy cricket fans, protestors ejected from Boxing Day Test at MCG, photograph, viewed 16th September 2013, < http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/boozy-cricket-fans-protestors-ejected-from-boxing-day-test-at-mcg/story-e6frf7kx-1226543589931>

Wiatrowski, M 2011, ‘The Dynamics of Fandom: Exploring Fan Communities in Online Spaces’, academic paper, accessed 7th September, 2013, <http://www.academia.edu/491940/The_Dynamics_of_Fandom_Exploring_Fan_Communities_in_Online_Spaces >

The Rock WWE Wallpaper, n.d, photograh, viewed 16th September 2013, <http://sportwpp.com/the-rock-wwe-wallpaper.html >

The confessions of a Technomaniac

1 Sep

My Iphone and I share a relationship which would be considered by some Medical professionals as borderline obsessive. Hello my name is Claire Cresswell and I am a technomaniac. My Iphone is much more than a communication device; it is my security blanket, my fashion guru, my bff. My Iphone gets me out of awkward situations; it entertains me when bored, it tells me if I can afford that dress and it gives me the security to verbalise my opinions; I feel more confident as my digitally-enhanced self.

In our BCM240 lecture, we were informed that this dependency towards our technological devices is a concern to society and that this contingent relationship is not just unhealthy, but could cause our demise. Bayer & Campbell (2012, p2084) evaluate mobile phones as an ‘ingrained element within society and are almost always at arm’s reach’. We are governed by a behaviour or habit to check our messages, ‘reacting to these cues becomes automatized to the point that the actor may do so without even meaning to do it (Oulasvirta et al. 2012). Society has morphed into a zombie –like existence in which our mobiles/iPods dictate our moods but not our actions. Text-driving for example, is a well-documented phenomenon which ‘places lives not just in the hands of the driver, but in the fingers’ (Bayer & Campbell 2012, pg 1). We are aware of the consequences of the act (police fine, injury, death) but not responsible enough to break the habit.

blog100

Texting doesn’t kill, it does not cause moral panic across the public sphere, it is the operator’s poor choices that come into play. Maybe it is time, we made better decisions and occasionally participated in a technological detox, a deliberate and regular unplugging can help us rediscover a more humane rhythm for our lives’ (McLuhan 2010).

From the words of my favorite singer, Passenger, ‘And we all had new IPhones but no one had no one to call’ (Song Title Year). Unfortunately, we are on our phones a lot of the time, this digital connection is ruining our chance of face-to face contacts, building social relationships and enjoying our immediate surroundings.

I believe technology and my Iphone are paramount in my survival of Uni life, but maybe my Iphone can sit in the boot when I drive and in my bag when I network.

I will finish with a question…Are we being anti social by not concentrating on the conversation in front of our faces or ignoring the person texting on our phone?

 

 

Bayer, JB & Campbell, SW 2012, ‘Texting while driving on automatic: Considering the frequency-independent side of habit’, Computers in Human Behaviour’, 28, 2083-2090

Maierbrugger, A 2010, ‘Beware of iPod zombies’, image, accessed 12th September 2013, <http://gulfnews.com/business/technology/beware-of-ipod-zombies-1.679558>

McLuhan, M 2010, ‘Technology Sabbaths and Other Strategies for the Digitized World’, The Frailest Thing, accessed 12th September 2013, <

http://thefrailestthing.com/2010/08/05/technology-sabbaths-and-other-strategies-for-keeping-our-humanity-intact/>

Oulasvirta, A, Ratenbury, T, MA, L, & Raita, E 2012, ‘Habits make smartphone use more pervasive’, Personal Ubiquitous Computing, 16 (1), 105-114

Does your family life revolve around the TV guide?

23 Aug

Prior to this week’s lecture, if you asked me if television controlled my life, I would consider you absurd and regrettably correct.

Television viewing is to me and most Australian’s, a national pastime with the Australian Bureau of Statistics reporting ‘Australian adults spend on average four hours per day doing sedentary leisure activities such as watching TV’ (ABS 2013). This charismatic ‘idiot box’ has evolved since its launch on the 16th September 1956 via constant innovations to its design and mobility, its affordable pricing and the diversity of media forms. Today, the television set is not seen as the precious item found in the front formal; it has ventured throughout the household, through domestic space/zones and through the convergence of other platforms, it has multiplied.

This week, I gained an understanding regarding the journey of television throughout the home; creating distinct audience-friendly space and privacy zones. To broaden my research and acquire a gender take on the topic, I chose to interview separately (one on one) my parents, my mother dearest and my tell-it-how-it-is stepfather. The dialogue was kept simple with open and closed ended questions and revolved around their own personal television experiences and viewing space in their household.

Both are of similar age, brought up in the 70s, when the television was the huge set in the formal lounge room. My mum’s memories revolve around being placed in front of the television when ‘Kimba’ was on, ‘I was raised by a Television’ (Cresswell 2013 pers. comm., 22 August).

Kimba

My Stepfather, on the other hand, spent till dark, playing outside so television viewing for him was a true family event; watching Friday night sport and eating fish and chips. In the 70s, society’s concept of childhood was carefree and technologically challenged with the television being a valued commodity, one per household.

As media developed, so did the use and location of the family television/s. It ‘entered the home for communal use in the living room and gradually relocated to kitchens, bedrooms, even hallways’ (Livingstone 2007). This invasion of space developed privacy zones in which the audience/inhabitant of the room could choose where to locate the television set and its function.

My stepdad uses his designated television viewing time to relax; putting his feet up and attaching the remote to his hand so he could constantly flick the channels. His privacy zone or haven is in the lounge room with the comfy chairs and the Television fixed as the focal point in the wall. My mother, on the other hand, likes to multi-task so television viewing is performed via the family-room where the Television is visible from the kitchen (cooking dinner) and the dining room (when on the computer or ironing). This cultural perception of privacy sectors is evident in my interview results highlighting my parents’ current home has distinct divisions which are personalised to encompass the requirements of the audience and the accessibility of the media available. My own personal preference of television space is in my messy bedroom where I can enjoy some alone time while attempting Uni work on my desk.

 

IMG_2356     IMG_2358      IMG_2359

Today, society embraces innovation and diversity in media and technology; enabling individuals to access multiple media platforms in the manner that suits ones own personal taste/lifestyle. This advancement in media has instigated a shift in family Television viewing. An Australian adult may watch an average of four hours of television a day (ABS 2013) but is he/she watching it by themselves in their own tailored private space/zone in the family home.

Does having more than one television, more choice and more space disconnect traditional ‘family time’?

 

Livingstone, S 2007, ‘From family television to bedroom culture: Young people’s media at home’, accessed 22nd August, 2013, <http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/2772/1/From_family_television_to_bedroom_culture_(LSERO).pdf>

ABS 2013,’Australians spend one month a year sitting watching TV’, Cat 4364.0.55.004- Australian Health Survey: Physical Activity, 2011-2012, Canberra, accessed 22nd August, 2013, <http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats%5Cabs@.nsf/mediareleasesbyCatalogue/19D9A81DC4ABD21BCA257BAC0016BBE9?Opendocument >

“Back in my day the cinema was a community event”

17 Aug

This week our media class discussed the problematic analysis utilised by researchers of grouping cinema audiences as demographic clusters; organised through background and association. Unfortunately, this practice can present a one-dimensional result. To ensure my research of the topic, ‘how has the cinema experience, space and audience changed over the years’, I decided to take the direct path of asking someone who was a ‘movie buff’ back in the day; an expert. In the 1960s, every week, my Grandmother walked to her local ‘Picture Theatre’ which was in the middle of the rural town of West Wyalong NSW. She shared her teenage memories with me describing her true cinema experience as being a Saturday afternoon must, a ‘social ritual’ shared with all her close friends and subsequently the entire Wyalong community.

My secondary research article, describes the cinema as just another public space where audiences would go ‘for entertainment and relaxation; for enlightenment or to be challenged’ (Aveyard 2011). Alternatively, my Grandmother explained that the cinema in her teenage years was a community event promoting positive social networks. Farmers would come off the land, town folk and their entire families, teenagers and their friends would gather at the cinema to meet up, have a chat and share a film. The film content included world news, cartoons for the children and a serial- type presentation so everyone present engaged in the performance and the social experience. ‘They provide opportunities for engagement with film culture, but can help promote important local community connections’ (Aveyard 2011). Nan, being the typical country teenager participated and cherished the positives of the cinema space, describing the experience as a personal ‘rite of passage’ where all the teenagers would meet their friends and race to acquire their seating. ’The older you were, the better the seats, the best being the backseats where all the cool kids sat ‘(Jones 2013, per. comm. 16 August).

The interview process broadened my understanding of the community experience in a rural cinema space and instigated a need to ascertain a complementary view; the social experience of an urban city goer. Why do we go to the movies? ‘‘To see a particular film” was overwhelmingly nominated as the most important factor influencing attendance, regarded as ‘very important’ by 77 % of respondents (Aveyard 2013). Urban audiences tend to partake in the entertainment aspect not for the communal experience. Alternatively, my Grandmother’s simple portrayal of rural cinema depicted a perfect space; a place to ‘have a chat’ and ice cream with friends, all achieved on 2 shillings 6 pence from Dad’s wallet. Nan’s experience of attending her cinema space was to gain a positive sense of belonging, to be part of the community in a public space.

Image

My grandmother represents the REAL CINEMA AUDIENCE. Forget the stereotypical images portraying the cinema experience as excessive techno and pretty people with pretty smiles. It’s all about real people and bona fide emotions; like running to the cinema to get your seat with your friends, full of excitement with coins in your pocket. The 1959 ‘Picture Theatre’ encompasses that small things, simple pleasures are paramount in making life sincerely memorable.

Nanna Jones would be the first person to inform these naïve researchers while rolling her eyes, “back in my day” the local cinema was a community event. By knowing your audience personally, one does not have to assume, to stereotype or to collectively cluster. 1959 was a safe space, a time when you could walk to the pictures alone without fear or judgement, a time to look forward to and to reminisce.

Times have definitely changed but has your cinema experience?

 

Aveyard, K 2011,’The Place of Cinema and Film in Contemporary Rural Australia’, Participations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, Vol 8, Is 2, pp 294-307, accessed 16th August, <http://www.participations.org/Volume%208/Issue%202/3a%20Aveyard.pdf>

Val Morgan 2011, Val Morgan Cinema Network, webpage, accessed on the 25th August 2013, < http://www.valmorgan.com.au/audiences/>